[pdf] VAWA-Legislative History Rape Protections and Housing Confidentiality Congressional Record (July30, 1995) (+)

Congressional Record July 30, 1995 Senator Biden discussing amendments in federal law needed to ensure that rape was included as on of the federal laws that is defined as causing serious bodily injury. Contains a significant statement on rape and the need for greater protections for rape victims. Discusses the important role of the Violence Against Women Act. This congressional record also includes the introduction of a 1996 Housing Act including early housing protections providing confidentiality for victims.

[pdf] Senate and House Extension of Remarks-Congressional Record March 31, 1995 (+)

Senator Kennedy on the creation of the Violence Against Women Act Office, (later renamed OVW), reinstatement with federal funds of the National Hotline, initiation of VAWA grant funding nationally, House: Stupak on creation of the VAWA Office; Slaughter on Appointment of Bonnie Campbell to lead the first VAWA Office (OVW) and initiation of OVW grant funding.

[pdf] Legislative History of VAWA (94, 00, 05), T and U-Visas, Battered Spouse Waiver, and VAWA Confidentiality (+)

This document recounts the legislative history of laws offering protection for victims of domestic violence sexual assault and human trafficking with a particular focus on the immigration relief developed by Congress to protect immigrant survivors.

[pdf] Women Immigrants and Domestic Violence (+)

Paper presented at a symposium convened by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars entitled Women’s Rights in Theory and Practice: Employment, Violence and Poverty, May 21-22, 2002. Discussing the demographics of immigrant women in the United States and the importance that services providers, advocates and attorneys learn how to provide culturally appropriate assistance to diverse immigrant victims, the significance of fear of deportation as a barrier, and the importance of identifying and working with survivors the continuum of violence immigrant survivors experience.

[pdf] Offering a Helping Hand: Legal Protections for Battered Immigrant Women: A History of Legislative Responses (+)

This article chronicles the legislative history of immigration protections afforded immigrant crime victims in the Violence Against Women Acts (VAWA) of 1994 and 2000, through the Battered Spouse Waiver, and through VAWA Confidentiality, the history and development of the VAWA self-petition, VAWA cancellation of removal, the battered spouse waiver, any credible evidence standard, VAWA confidentiality, benefits access for battered immigrant VAWA self-petitioners and cancellation/suspension applicants, the U-Visa, victim’s ability to obtain lawful permanent residency in the U.S. and Legal Services Corporation funded legal assistance are discussed in detail. This article collects and publishes information contained in documents developed during advocacy that led to the passage of federal immigration law legislation creating each of these protections.

[pdf] The Roles of Culture, Context, and Legal Immigrant Status on Intimate Partner Violence (+)

Intimate partner violence against immigrant women is at epidemic proportions, but research has only recently begun to address the concern. A review of the legal, medical, and social science research literature reveals little data, but that which exist demonstrate that immigrant women’s cultures, contexts, and legal status (a) increase vulnerability for abuse, (b) are used by batterers to control and abuse immigrant women, and (c) create barriers to women seeking and receiving help. Data also reveal that immigrant culture and context offer resiliency factors through which programs and policy can be used to better serve these populations.

[pdf] Lifetime Prevalence of Violence Against Latina Immigrants: Legal and Policy Implications (+)

This article examines the prevalence of various forms of domestic violence experienced by Latina immigrant women, the nature of the battering and extreme cruelty they experience, and public policy implications of the findings. The this research found high levels of intimate partner abuse experienced by immigrant Latinas and publishes data about immigrant victims in married to citizens and lawful permanent residents that Congress relied upon in when creating VAWA self-petitioning in 1994. Includes a discussion of immigration related abuse, details about the types of physical, sexual and emotional abuse victims suffered, describes the types of emotional abuse that are significantly related to physical and sexual abuse, and provides empirical data documenting several of the factors that in and of themselves or collectively constitute “extreme cruelty” under U.S. immigration laws.

[pdf] The Violence Against Women Act of 1994: Evaluation of the STOP Block Grants to Combat Violence Against Women (+)

This report documents the federal and state activities and accomplishments in the initial year of implementing the resulting “STOP Violence Against Women” grants program. It was developed under a competitively awarded grant from the National Institute of Justice to provide a basis for reporting on the progress and impact of the program.

[pdf] Turning the Act Into Action: The Violence Against Women Law (+)

In the making for over four years, The Violence Against Women Act is finally law. Now it is time to turn the Act into action. Beginning in 1990, through a series of hearings and reports, the Senate Judiciary Committee studied the kinds of crimes- namely rape and family violence- that disproportionately burden women. What we learned is that our society and our criminal justice system routinely ignore and dismiss this violence, with tragic consequences for women, for their children, and ultimately for all of us.

[pdf] Domestic Violence: Not Just a Family Matter (+)

This hearing is about 4 million women a year whose names and faces are not gracing magazine covers and are not on the evening news. This hearing has three purposes: let you know that this could happen to someone you know, learn about mandatory arrest, and we are dedicated towards stopping domestic violence.

[pdf] CRS: Domestic Violence: Data, Programs, and Funding (December 14, 1998) (+)

Domestic violence generally refers to overt physical abuse, sexual violence, or psychological violence between spouses, ex-spouses, boyfriends or girlfriends. Estimates of the level of domestic violence nationwide vary depending on how the term is defined, with most researchers agreeing that the majority of domestic violence victims are women.
The federal government administers two Acts to address domestic violence: the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act, and the Violence Against Women Act. A third federal program, the Victims of Crime Act, also includes services for victims of domestic violence. This report presents statistics on domestic violence, and discusses federal programs to deal with the problem.

[pdf] VAWA 1994-The Response to Rape: Detours on the Road to Equal Justice (+)

This report culminates a three year investigation by the Judiciary Committee’s majority staff concerning the causes and effects of violence against women. Women in America suffer all the crimes that plague the nation. But there are some crimes that disproportionately burden women. Through a series of hearings and reports, the committee has studied this violence in an effort to determine what steps we can take to make women more safe.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women: Federal Funding and Recent Developments (December 19, 1997) (+)

Each year women report approximately 500,000 rapes and sexual assaults, according to a recently designed Bureau of Justice Statistics survey. The extent and seriousness of the problem of violence against women first was addressed in 1990 by legislation proposing a federal response. Over the next several years, Congress began to address mounting public concern about gender-related crime, culminating in the enactment of new penalties under the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, and the establishment of several grant programs under its Tile IV, the Violence Against Women Act (P.L. 103-322). Since passage of P.L. 103-322, Congress has been supportive regarding funding. In FY1997, Congress approved VAWA funding for selected programs at the Department of Justice at $197.5 million and at the Department of Health and Human Services for $61 million. In FY1998, Congress approved VAWA funding for selected programs at the Department of Justice at $270.75 million and at the Department of Health and Human Services at $154 million.

[pdf] CRS: Domestic Violence: Data, Programs and Funding (December 30, 1997) (+)

Domestic violence generally refers to overt physical abuse, sexual violence, or psychological violence between spouses, ex-spouses, boyfriends or girlfriends. Estimates of the level of domestic violence nationwide vary depending on how the term is defined, with most researchers agreeing that the majority of domestic violence victims are women.
The federal government administers two Acts to address domestic violence: the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act, and the Violence Against Women Act. A third federal program, the Victims of Crime Act, also includes services for victims of domestic violence. This report presents statistics on domestic violence, and discusses federal programs to deal with the problem.

[pdf] Violence Against Women: A Week in the Life of America (+)

A report that graphically portrays the human tragedy of a single “Week in the Life of America’s Women.” We have found that in 1991, at least 21,000 domestic crimes against women were reported to the police every week, almost one-fifth of all aggravated assaults reported to the police are aggravated assaults in the home, and these figures reveal a total of at least 1.1 million assaults, aggravated assaults, murders, and rapes against women committed in the home and reported to the police (unreported crimes may be more than three times this total).

[pdf] CRS: Sexual Harassment and Violence Against Women: Developments in Federal Law (May 12, 1997) (+)

Gender-based discrimination, harassment, and violence against women in the home, workplace, and society at large have received increasing legislative and judicial attention in recent years. Legal doctrines condemning the extortion of sexual favors as a condition of employment or job advancement, and other sexually offensive workplace behaviors resulting in a “hostile environment,” continue to evolve from judicial decisions under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and related federal laws. The courts and EEOC have interpreted Title VII to protect both men and women against workplace sexual harassment by the opposite sex. In 1994, Congress broke new legal ground by creating a civil rights cause of action for victims of “crimes of violence motivated by gender.” The new law also made it a federal offense to travel interstate with the intent to “injure, harass, or intimidate” a spouse, causing bodily harm to the spouse by a crime of violence.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women: Federal Funding and Recent Developments (October 1, 1996) (+)

According to a newly designed Bureau of Justice Statistics survey, “women annually reported about 500,000 rapes and sexual assaults…” Legislation proposing a federal response to the problem of violence against women was first introduced in 1990. Over the next several years, congressional actions to address public concerns about this problem culminated in the enactment of new penalties under the Violence Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, and the establishment of several grant programs under its Title IV, the Violence Against Women Act (P.L. 103-322). In FY1996, Congress approved VAWA funding for selected problems, including the Department of Justice ($165 million); and the Department of Health and Human Services ($54 million). In FY1997, Congress approved VAWA funding for selected programs including the Department of Justice ($197.5 million), and the Department of Health and Human Services ($61 million).

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women: Recent Developments (October 4, 1995) (+)

There is now available new and more accurate data about the extent of violence against women. According to a newly designed Bureau of Justice Statistics survey, “women annually reported about 500,000 rapes and sexual assaults…” Legislation proposing a Federal response to the problem of violence against women was first introduced in 1990. Over the next several years, congressional actions to address public concerns about this problem culminated in the enactment of new penalties under the Violence Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, and the establishment of several grant programs under its Title IV, the Violence Against Women Act (P.L. 103-322). Within the FY1996 appropriations process, the House and Senate have approved funding for several programs under the Violence Against Women Act.