[pdf] Stories from the Field (+)

This collection of stories was developed to illustrate the harms to immigrant victims of domestic violence and sexual assault that would occur if proposed changes in the immigration protections offered under VAWA and U visa immigration relief were rolled back. Provisions in the House VAWA Reauthorization of 2012 proposed to make significant changes to the U visa program that would cut off U visa access for many victims, would end U visa lawful permanent residency protections, and would impose case processing changes that would endanger victim safety. This storybook contributed to President Obama issuing a veto threat of legal protections currently available in law were rolled back in VAWA 2013 for any victims. The stories illustrate how victims will be harmed if access to lawful permanent residency for u visa victims is denied; why U visa holders need lawful permanent residency, U visa case benefits for victim safety and law enforcement even when no criminal case is opened or pursued; and Perpetrator Interference With Victim Access to VAWA Immigration Relief.

[pdf] Collecting Stories to Illustrate the Need for Proposed Reforms to Aid Immigrant Victims (+)

Story collection allows advocates to assess and document the problems that victims face in their communities when they seek help from the police, the justice system, victim services, social services, or the healthcare system. This story collection tool provides a step by step guide to help advocates, attorneys and community based programs working with crime victims document problems in the field that victims encounter that impede their access to services, the justice system, health care and other assistance and legal rights. This story collection process can be tailored to a variety of different issues and groups of victims.

[pdf] Access to Legal Services for Immigrant Victims of Domestic Violence Sexual Assault and Trafficking (+)

Collection of stories illustrating immigrant victims need for access to legal services from LSC funded legal services agencies. These stories illustrate the dangers that will be prevented and the victims that will be helped by the VAWA 2005 amendments that guarantee that LSC-funded legal services programs can offer a range of life-saving legal assistance to immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and trafficking. This story collection was developed to encourage LSC funded agencies to implement the VAWA 2005 changes and open their doors to immigrant victims and to assist LSC in writing policies and regulations that result in improved immigrant victim access to legal services.

[pdf] New Dangers for Battered Immigrants: The Untold Effects When Immigrant Victims Have to Leave the U.S. to Obtain Lawful Permanent Residency as VAWA Self-Petitioners (+)

The stories recounted in this volume document the experiences of battered immigrants from around the country. In all of these cases, battered immigrants either filed or are in the process of filing self-petitions. Once the battered immigrant’s self-petition is approved the victim may apply for lawful permanent residency. The purpose of this compilation has been to highlight the potential hardships and dangers that battered immigrants face if they would be required to leave the United States and travel abroad to receive lawful permanent residency based upon their approved VAWA self-petition. Historically, battered immigrants abused by their U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident spouses or parents have been generally able to attain lawful permanent residency while continuing to reside in the United States. The stories collected here were used to secure amendments in VAWA 2000 that together with DHS policies allow immigrant victims to obtain lawful permanent residency without being required to leave the United States.

[pdf] T and U-visa Holders Need Legal Permanent Residency: Real Life Stories (+)

A collection of real life stories that illustrate the hardships U visa and T visa holders face without access to lawful permanent residency included in the U visa and T visa statues. This collection was submitted to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Office of Budget and Management as part of advocacy to secure issuance and influence the protections that would be included in the T and U visa lawful permanent residency (adjustment of status) regulations.

[pdf] The Violence Against Women Act Now Ensures Legal Services for Immigrant Victims (+)

Article discussing the need for the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”) 2005’s expansions of access to legal services for immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking. An overview of the VAWA 2005 Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) amendments is provided including who is newly eligible, the scope of allowable representation, and best practices for implementation of the new law.

[pdf] Crossing the Threshold to Safety: Stories of Immigrant Crime Victims Who Will Benefit From Attaining U-visas (+)

Stories of victims who will benefit from U visa protections. These stories were collected as part of the effort to secure regulations implementing the U visa protections that became law as part of VAWA 2005.

[pdf] St. Petersburg Times Article: For Lack of Legal Services (+)

An article on a the death of Mariella Batista, a battered immigrant who was turned away from legal services under new Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) restrictions on representing immigrants, and was subsequently killed by her batterer on the courthouse steps in California. This story was the catalyst that led to the passage of the Kennedy Amendment to the LSC Appropriations Act in 1996 authorizing the use of non-LSC funds to represent some battered immigrants.

[pdf] New York Times Article: A Test of Congressional Conscience (+)

An article on a the death of Mariella Batista a battered immigrant who was turned away from legal services under new Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) restrictions on representing immigrants, and was subsequently killed by her batterer on the courthouse steps in California. This story was the catalyst that led to the passage of the Kennedy Amendment to the LSC Appropriations Act in 1996 authorizing the use of non-LSC funds to represent some battered immigrants.

[pdf] Washington Post Article: Abused Immigrant Slain After Plea for Legal Services Help Is Denied (+)

An article on the death of Mariella Batista, a battered immigrant who was turned away from legal services under new Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) restrictions on representing immigrants, and was subsequently killed by her batterer on the courthouse steps in California. This story was the catalyst that led to the passage of the Kennedy Amendment to the LSC Appropriations Act in 1996 authorizing the use of non-LSC funds to represent some battered immigrants.