[pdf] Slides Webinar Immigrant Victim Access Federally Assisted Housing (February 22, 2017) (+)

PowerPoint presentation slides for the webinar on access to public and assisted housing, shelter and transitional housing for immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, dating violence, trafficking, abused and abandoned immigrant children and immigrant homeless. The document included the PowerPoint presentation and the cover list of documents distributed with the webinar.

[msword] Form for Benefits Granting Agencies to Use to Obtain Verification of Benefits Eligibility for Qualified Battered Immigrants (+)

This is a word document that benefits granting agencies can use to request verification of benefits eligibility for VAWA self-petitioners and other battered qualified immigrants including victims with pending or approved I-130 family based visa petitions. Qualified battered immigrants will be eligible for federal and state public benefits but their cases are not included in the SAVE system and the Interim Guidance directs that should benefits verification be necessary that an alternate system be used for VAWA self-petition cases. The location of where this form should be sent changes over time. For current information for government agencies seeking verification on where to submit this form contact the DHS Office on Policy and Strategy Eric Tijerina: eric.j.tijerina@uscis.dhs.gov or 202-272-1068

[pdf] Services Available to Victims of Human Trafficking: A Resource Guide for Social Services Providers (+)

Provides an overview of the state and federally funded benefits and services available to victims of human trafficking. Includes access to public benefits offered by HHS, USDA, HUD, USDOJ, SSA, DOL, and DOE (Education).

[pdf] Public Benefits and Language Access (+)

Presentation at the Culture and Compassion Conference Indianapolis, Indiana covering access to federal and state funded assistance and services to immigrant victims without regard to immigration status, state and federal public benefits open to qualified immigrants and legal requirements of U.S. language access laws.

*Breaking Barriers Table of Contents

Breaking Barriers is a comprehensive manual that provides information that will be useful to advocates, attorneys, justice, and social services professionals working with and assisting immigrant survivors of domestic and family violence. This Manual provides a detailed overview explanation of immigrant survivors’ legal rights under immigration, family, public benefits, and criminal laws and their rights to […]

[pdf] Comparison Chart of Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Self-Petitioning, U visa, and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) (+)

This chart compares forms of crime victim based immigration relief for immigrant children. It covers VAWA self-petitioning for child abuse victims, the U visa for child victims of child abuse, sexual assault and other forms of criminal activity and special immigrant juvenile status available for children who have been abused, abandoned or neglected by one or both of their parents. The chart compares eligibility for immigration relief, the immigration relief process, timing of access to lawful permanent residency and access to public benefits and services among these three forms of immigration relief.

[pdf] U-Visa Victim Benefits Eligibility Process (+)

This benchcard discusses the eligibility requirements to qualify for a U-Visa, the application procedure for U-Visas, and possible benefits for which approved U-Visa applicants may be eligible.

[pdf] Public Benefits Flow Charts: VAWA Self‐Petition and Cancellation, U-Visas, T-Visas, and SIJS (+)

The public benefits flow charts pertain to VAWA self-petition and cancellation, U-Visas, T-Visas, and Special Juvenile Immigrant Status (SIJS). Specifically, the charts explain access to federal and state public benefits for battered immigrant spouses and children of U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents, victims of human trafficking, U-Visa victims, and SIJS victims.

[pdf] Family Court Bench Card on Immigrant Crime Victim Access to Public Benefits and Services (+)

This document pertains to a family court bench card on immigrant crime victim access to public benefits and services. It explains the public benefits for undocumented domestic violence victims, and the additional public benefits for domestic violence victims who are lawfully present.

[pdf] VAWA Public Benefits Eligibility Process: VAWA Self-Petitioners, VAWA Cancellation of Removal, and VAWA Suspension of Deportation (+)

This Bench Card contains information on the VAWA public benefits eligibility process, including the following: immigration status qualification requirements, VAWA cancellation of removal and suspension of deportation, battered spouse waiver, and how to become a “qualified immigrant” who is eligible to receive federal and state public benefits.

[pdf] Benchcard: Trafficking Victim Benefits Eligibility Process (+)

This Benchcard discusses the qualifications for Continued Presence status, how to apply for and obtain Office of Refugee and Resettlement benefits eligibility based on Continued Presence, qualifications for T-Visa status, how to apply for a T-Visa, and how to receive benefits after receiving Continued Presence status or a T-Visa. It also outlines the federal and state public benefits and other government-funded programs available to trafficking victims as well as the eligibility period.

[pdf] Flowchart of Access to Federal and State Public Benefits for Victims of Human Trafficking (+)

This is a flowchart regarding access to federal and state public benefits for victims of human trafficking, including services necessary to protect life and safety.

[pdf] Flowchart on Access to Federal and State Public Benefits for Battered Immigrant Spouses and Children of U.S. Citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents (+)

This is a flowchart pertaining to abused family members’ access to federal and state public benefits, including services necessary to protect life and safety.

[pdf] Flowchart on Access to Federal and State Public Benefits For U-Visa Victims (+)

This is a flowchart on U-Visa victims’ access to federal and state public benefits, including services necessary to protect life and safety.

[pdf] Services and Assistance Legally Available to Help Immigrant Victims of Violence Against Women (+)

Training powerpoint on public benefits from the December 1, 2010 Sioux Falls, South Dakata

[pdf] Medicaid and CHIP Coverage of “Lawfully Residing” Children and Pregnant Women (+)

A memo that provides guidance on the implementation of the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA), Public Law 11-3. Section 214 of CHIPRA permits states to cover certain children and pregnant women in both Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) who are “lawfully residing in the United States” as described in section 1903(v)(4) and 2107(e)(1)(J) of the Social Security Act.

[pdf] Q&A: Five-Year Bar (+)

This document contains questions and answers regarding immigrants and the five-year bar. Section 403 of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) provides that certain immigrants who enter the United States on or after August 22, 1996 are not eligible to receive federally-funded benefits, including Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), for five years from the date they enter the country with a status as a “qualified alien.”

[pdf] Q&A on the Five-Year Bar (+)

This document pertains to the Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ questions and answers on the five-year bar. Section 403 of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) provides that certain immigrants who enter the United States on or after August 22, 1996 are not eligible to receive federally-funded benefits, including Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), for five years from the date they enter the country with a status as a “qualified alien.”

[pdf] Offering a Helping Hand: Legal Protections for Battered Immigrant Women: A History of Legislative Responses (+)

This article chronicles the legislative history of immigration protections afforded immigrant crime victims in the Violence Against Women Acts (VAWA) of 1994 and 2000, through the Battered Spouse Waiver, and through VAWA Confidentiality, the history and development of the VAWA self-petition, VAWA cancellation of removal, the battered spouse waiver, any credible evidence standard, VAWA confidentiality, benefits access for battered immigrant VAWA self-petitioners and cancellation/suspension applicants, the U-Visa, victim’s ability to obtain lawful permanent residency in the U.S. and Legal Services Corporation funded legal assistance are discussed in detail. This article collects and publishes information contained in documents developed during advocacy that led to the passage of federal immigration law legislation creating each of these protections.

[pdf] Guidance on Standards and Methods for Determining Whether a Substantial Connection Exists Between Battery or Extreme Cruelty and Need for Specific Public Benefits (+)

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), as amended by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996, provides that certain categories of aliens who have been subjected to battery or extreme cruelty in the United States are “qualified aliens” eligible for certain federal, state, and local public benefits. To be qualified under this provision, an alien must demonstrate, among other things, that there is a substantial connection between the battery or extreme cruelty and the need for the public benefit sought. This notice provides guidance to benefit providers regarding substantial connection determinations.

[pdf] Interim Guidance on Verification of Citizenship, Qualified Alien Status, and Eligibility Under Title IV of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (+)

Title IV of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (“PRWORA”) requires the Attorney General, by February 1998, to promulgate regulations requiring verification that an applicant for federal public benefits is a qualified alien eligible to receive federal public benefits under the Act. Amendments to the PRWORA by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 also require the Attorney General, within the same time period, to establish fair and nondiscriminatory procedures for applicants to provide proof of citizenship. Amendments to the PRWORA by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 require the Attorney General, by November 3, 1997, to issue interim verification guidance that sets forth procedures that benefit providers can use to verify citizenship, qualified alien status, and eligibility under Title IV of the PRWORA prior to issuance of the final regulations. In accordance with this last statutory requirement, the Attorney General, in consultation with federal benefit-granting agencies, has developed this interim guidance.

[pdf] Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRAIRA) of 1996 (+)

Full version of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRAIRA) of 1996 , public law 104-208. Confidentiality provisions are listed in Section 384.