VAWA Confidentiality Protections for Immigrant Crime Victims in the Context of Immigration Enforcement (March 3, 2017)

The Three Prongs of VAWA Confidentiality and Courthouse Protections for Immigrant Victims of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Human Trafficking and Other U Visa Criminal Activities (March 3, 2017) By: Leslye E. Orloff VAWA confidentiality was designed to enhance protection for immigrant crime victims in several significant ways.  It allows victims to confidentially file for immigration relief […]

Trafficking Victims Protection Act and Reauthorization Acts

Trafficking Victims Protection and Reauthorization Act of 2008 Trafficking Victims Protection and Reauthorization Act of 2008: Statute (As Enacted) Trafficking Victims Protection and Reauthorization Act of 2008, H.R. 7311 (Analysis of Selected Sections (§§ 105, 201, 204, 205, 211, 212, 238) Prepared by Legal Momentum) Trafficking Victims Protection and Reauthorization Act of 2005 Trafficking Victims Protection and […]

[pdf] VAWA-Legislative History Rape Protections and Housing Confidentiality Congressional Record (July30, 1995) (+)

Congressional Record July 30, 1995 Senator Biden discussing amendments in federal law needed to ensure that rape was included as on of the federal laws that is defined as causing serious bodily injury. Contains a significant statement on rape and the need for greater protections for rape victims. Discusses the important role of the Violence Against Women Act. This congressional record also includes the introduction of a 1996 Housing Act including early housing protections providing confidentiality for victims.

[pdf] Senate and House Extension of Remarks-Congressional Record March 31, 1995 (+)

Senator Kennedy on the creation of the Violence Against Women Act Office, (later renamed OVW), reinstatement with federal funds of the National Hotline, initiation of VAWA grant funding nationally, House: Stupak on creation of the VAWA Office; Slaughter on Appointment of Bonnie Campbell to lead the first VAWA Office (OVW) and initiation of OVW grant funding.

[pdf] VAWA Suspension of Deportation Interlineated Statute: VAWA 1994, 2000, 2005 (+)

This document tracks amendments creating VAWA suspension of deportation in 1994 and amendments occurring to VAWA suspension of deportation by VAWA 2000 and VAWA 2005. Please note that VAWA suspension of deportation continues as an option for battered spouses and children of U.S. citizen and lawful permanent resident abusers despite the fact that suspension of deportation was removed from the Immigration and Nationality Act by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996. The code section that used to apply to suspension of deportation including VAWA suspension of deportation was INA Section 244. When suspension of deportation was replaced by cancellation of removal the INA section that had been used for suspension of deportation was reassigned to Temporary Protected Status. Although the code section was eliminated from the INA for VAWA suspension of deportation the immigration relief remains available for battered immigrant spouses and children of US citizens and lawful permanent residents and VAWA suspension of deportation has continued to be improved in subsequent reauthorizations of VAWA.

[pdf] Bipartisan Women Made Anti-Violence Act Happen (+)

Article by Ann Moline Women’s Enews correspondent, on the collaboration between Democratic and Republican Senate staff who led Senator Kennedy and Abraham’s work on the Violence Against Women Act of 2000’s immigration protections including the creation of the U and T Visas and improvements to VAWA self-petitioning, VAWA cancellation of removal and VAWA suspension of deportation.

[pdf] Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (+)

A copy of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 -Public Law 103-322 [H.R.3355];
Relevant Section: TITLE IV—-VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN; Subtitle G—-Protections for Battered Immigrant Women and Children; Sec. 40701—-ALIEN PETITIONING RIGHTS FOR IMMEDIATE RELATIVE OR SECOND PREFERENCE STATUS.;
Amends Section 204(a)(1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1154(a)(1))

[pdf] William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 (+)

Public Law 110-457; [H.R. 7311] An act to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2008 through 2011 for the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, to enhance measure to combat trafficking in persons, and for other purposes.

[pdf] Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (+)

Recent Developments in VAWA: History and Federal Funding: FY2007- President Bush requested $366 million for the violence against women programs administered by the Department of Justice and $177 million for programs administered by the Department of Health and Human Services, for a total of $543 million.

[pdf] Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (+)

September 15, 2004, FY2005, Senate Appropriations Committee recommended $410 million for violence against women programs administers by the DOJ and $131.5 million for programs administered by the Department of Health and Human Services. The $131.5 million would be divided into $128 million for the battered women shelters program and $3.5 million for a national domestic violence hotline.

[pdf] Legislative History of VAWA (94, 00, 05), T and U-Visas, Battered Spouse Waiver, and VAWA Confidentiality (+)

This document recounts the legislative history of laws offering protection for victims of domestic violence sexual assault and human trafficking with a particular focus on the immigration relief developed by Congress to protect immigrant survivors.

[pdf] Deferred Action for VAWA Self-Petitioners (+)

This paper proposes factors USCIS should consider using as it updates its deferred action policies and/or VAWA self-petitioning regulations with regard to granting deferred action to VAWA self-petitioners and any children or parents included in the VAWA self-petition. Since immigrant children and parents included in their parent’s or child’s self-petitions are considered self-petitioners, derivative children and parents included in VAWA self-petitions should receive deferred action status at the same time deferred action is granted to the battered immigrant filing the VAWA self-petition. No additional filing should be required.

[pdf] Chapter 03: VAWA Confidentiality: History, Purpose, DHS Implementation, and Violations of VAWA Confidentiality Protections (+)

Chapter in Empowering Survivors: Legal Rights of Immigrant Victims of Sexual Assault. This chapter contains detailed legislative history on the development and evolution of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) confidentiality protections under U.S. immigration laws. VAWA’s immigration confidentiality protections accomplish three objectives: 1) preventing DHS, DOJ and the U.S. State Department from relying on information provided by a perpetrator or the perpetrator’s family member to harm victims; 2) barring the release by government officials of information about the existence of, actions taken in, or materials contained in a VAWA confidentiality protected case file; and 3) establishing a list of protected locations at which immigration enforcement actions in cases involving immigrant crime victims are not to take place. This chapter discusses each of these protections in detail and includes statutory and legislative history, regulations and government policies implementing VAWA confidentiality protections. This chapter also contains a discussion of sanctions applicable to DHS, DOJ, and State Department officials when VAWA confidentiality violations occur.

[pdf] Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (+)

President Obama’s FY2011 budget request for violence against women programs administered by the DOJ was $457 million and $192.36 million for programs administered by HHS. This was after signined into the law a Consolidated Appropriations Act (PL 111-117; HR 3288) providing a total FY2010 funding of $444.50 million for VAWA programs administered by DOJ and $181.41 million for VAWA programs administered by HHS. The act provides $210 million for the STOP grant program and $130.05 million for family violence/battered women’s shelters.

[pdf] An Abbreviated Sketch of the William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 (P.L. 100-457): Criminal Law Provisions (+)

Report to accompany H.R. 972. The Committee on International Relations, to whom the bill (H.R. 972) was referred to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2006 and 2007 for the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

[pdf] Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (+)

H.Res. 1394 was introduced on 7/31/2008 by Representative Towns. The Bill would (1) applaud the efforts of organizations to combat DV and assist victims and (2) support increasing public awareness of DV and its consequences; For FY2009 House Appropriations Committee $435 million for VAWA programs administered by the DOJ ($200 million for STOP grants) as compared with the Senate Appropriations Committee recommendation of $415 million ($185 million for STOP grants). For FY2009, President Bush requests $280 million for proposed consolidated VAWA program (the Prevention and Prosecution of Violence Against Women and Related Victim Services Program).

[pdf] Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (+)

For FY2009 the House Appropriations Committee has approved a draft bill that recommends $435 million for VAWA programs administered by the DOJ ($200 million for STOP grants) as compared to $415 million ($185 for STOP grants) recommended by the Senate Appropriations Committee.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (June 12, 2008) (+)

Senate Judiciary Committee approved S. 1515 on May 15, 2008, which would establish the National Domestic Violence Volunteer Attorney Network; FY2009– President Bush proposes to consolidated the current formula and discretionary VAWA programs administered by the OVW and certain victims of child abuse programs that are administered by the Office of Justice Programs in a new program: the Prevention and Prosecution of Violence Against Women and Related Victim Services. The administration requests $280 million for this consolidated VAWA program, which would be administered by DOJ.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (March 6, 2008) (+)

FY2009- President Bush again proposed a consolidation of current formula and discretionary VAWA programs with certain victims of child abuse programs under the umbrella of Prevention and Prosecution of Violence Against Women and Related Victims Services Program. The Bush Administration requested $280 million for this consolidated program, which would be administered by DOJ.

Authorization expired for the following DV programs: Grants for Battered Women’s Shelters (42 USC 10409(a)), National Domestic Violence Hotline and Internet Grant (42 USC 10416), Demonstration Grants for Community Initiatives (42 USC 10418(h)), and Transitional Housing Assistance. The Consolidated Appropriations Act for FY2008 (PL 110-161) provided total funding of $575.47 million for violence against women programs ($400 million VAWA DOJ and $172.47 million for HHS). The request was for $546.28 million ($370 million and 176.28 million respectively.)

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (January 10, 2008) (+)

The Consolidated Appropriations Act for FY2008 (PL 110-161) provided total funding of $525.47 million for violence against women programs. The act provided $400 million for VAWA programs administered by DOJ. It also provided $125.47 million for battered women’s shelters and the national domestic violence hotline which are both administered by HHS. This reflected the mandated 1.747% spending cut for the Departments of Labor-HHA-Education. The total FY2008 budget request for VAWA programs was $54.28 million ($370 million and $176.28 to DOJ and HHS, respectively). The Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution (PL 110-5), provided total FY2007 funding of $558.92 million ($382.57 million and 176.35 million for DOJ and HHS, respectively.)

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (October 31, 2007) (+)

On Oct. 16, 2007, the Senate passed version HR 3093, the Commerce Justice-Science (CJS) Appropriations Act, which provided funding of $419 million for VAWA programs under DOJ compared to funding of $459 million for these programs in the House-passed bill. The Senate adopted an amendment that would provide total funding for three VAWA programs as follows: $60 million for grants to encourage arrest policies, $4 million for grants for engaging men and youth in prevention programs, and $1 million for the National Resources Center on Workplace Responses.

On Oct. 23, 2007, the Senate passed its version of HR 3043, the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for FY2008, which would provide funding of $127 million for grants for the battered women’s shelters program and $3.20 million for the national domestic violence hotline program. The House-passed bill would provide funding of $134.73 for battered women’s shelters and $2.97 million for the national domestic violence hotline.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding September 19, 2007) (+)

On July 26, 2007, the House passed HR 3093, the Commerce, Justice, Science and related Agencies Appropriations Act, which provided FY2008 funding of $459 million for VAWA programs in DOJ. Three amendments were adopted during floor debate that increased VAWA funding $29 million above the level recommended by the Appropriations Committee. An amendment introduced by Representative Capito sought to provide a $10 million increase in funding for the Rural Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Enforcement program, for a total of $50 million. Representative Inslee sponsored an amendment that sought to provide an additional $14 million for the Office on Violence Against Women, of which $6 million was to be for services to advocated for and respond to youth, $6 million was to be used to assist children and youth exposed to violence, $1 million for research relating to violence against Indian women, and $1 million for the national tribal sex offender registry. An amendment introduced by Representative Reichert would provide $5 million for the court training and improvements to respond to victims of violence program. The sponsors of these amendments provided spending reductions in other accounts in order to maintain the total spending for the bill.

On July 19, 2007, the House pass HR 3043, the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for FY2008, which provides $2.97 million for the national domestic violence hotline and $134.73 million for the battered women’s shelters program.

Both the House and Senate Appropriations Committees rejected the DOJ’s proposal to consolidate VAWA programs into one competiteve discretionary grant program with funding of $370 million.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (August 2, 2007) (+)

On July 26, 2007, the House passed HR 3093, the Commerce, Justice, Science and related Agencies Appropriations Act, which provided FY2008 funding of $459 million for VAWA programs in DOJ. Three amendments were adopted during floor debate that increased VAWA funding $29 million above the level recommended by the Appropriations Committee. An amendment introduced by Representative Capito sought to provide a $10 million increase in funding for the Rural Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Enforcement program, for a total of $50 million. Representative Inslee sponsored an amendment that sought to provide an additional $14 million for the Office on Violence Against Women, of which $6 million was to be for services to advocated for and respond to youth, $6 million was to be used to assist children and youth exposed to violence, $1 million for research relating to violence against Indian women, and $1 million for the national tribal sex offender registry. An amendment introduced by Representative Reichert would provide $5 million for the court training and improvements to respond to victims of violence program. The sponsors of these amendments provided spending reductions in other accounts in order to maintain the total spending for the bill. (An update was made to this report in September 2007, but there are no substantial changes.)

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding Appropriations 2008 (June 12, 2007) (+)

President Bush requested total VAWA funding of $546.28 million for FY2008. $370 million will be used for programs administered by DOJ and 4176.28 will be used for programs administered by HHS. The Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution was enacted (PL 110-05) which provided total FY2007 appropriations of $558.92 million for VAWA ($382.57 million for DOJ and 4176.35 million for HHS).

[pdf] The 2005 Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (+)

The author provides an overview of the history of congressional involvement with the Violence Against Women Act’s (VAWA) provisions to protect immigrant victims of domestic violence and other forms of violence against women. He also outlines the reasoning behind, and purpose of, the most recent enhancements in legal protections for immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, trafficking, and foreign fiances and spouses that were included in the recently reauthorized VAWA 2005, also describing the bipartisan work that resulted in this newest piece of legislation.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (January 23, 2007) (+)

The 109th Congress failed to pass both the Science-State-Justice-Commerce (HR 5672) and the Departments of Labor-Health and Human Services-Educations appropriations (HR 5647 and S 3708) bills for FY2007. A third continuing resolution was enacted (PL 109-383; HJRes. 102) on December 9, 2006 that provided funding for VAWA programs through February 15, 2007 based on FY2006 funding levels. The appropriations process was completed by the 110th Congress.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (December 1, 2005) (+)

On November 22, 2005, President Bush signed the Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, FY2006. It provides $385.5 million for Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) programs administered by the Department of Justice (DOJ).
On October 4, 2005, the Senate voited to amend S. 1197, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) of 2005, as reported earlier by the Judiciary Committee, and subsequently passed the bill by unanimous consent. In addition to making technical corrections, this floor amendment modified housing and other provisions in the bill, and inserted a new Title X related to DNA fingerprinting.
During the 108th Congress, the Keeping Children and Families Safe Act of 2003 and the PROTECT Act were passed, which, among other provisions, authorized funding of HHS and DOJ transitional housing assistance programs for victims of domestic violence, respectively.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (October 21, 2005) (+)

On October 4, 2005, the Senate voted to amend S. 1197, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) of 2005, as reported earlier by the Judiciary Committee, and subsequently passed the bill by unanimous consent. In addition to making technical corrections, this floor amendment modified housing and other provisions in the bill, and inserted a new Title X related to DNA fingerprinting.
On September 28, 2005, the House approved H.R. 3402, the Department of Justice (DOJ) Appropriations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 through 2009, which contains the House version of the VAWA Reauthorization Act of 2005. These bills would reauthorize VAWA; continue to encourage collaboration among law enforcement, judicial personnel, and public and private service providers to victims of domestic violence; address the special needs of victims of domestic and sexual violence, including the elderly, disabled, children, youth, and individuals of ethnic and racial communities; provide emergency leave and long-term transitional housing for victims; make provisions gender neutral; and require studies and reports on the effectiveness of approaches used for certain grants in combating domestic and sexual violence.
During the 108th Congress, the Keeping Children and Families Safe Act of 2003 and the PROTECT Act were passed, which, among other provisions, authorized funding of HHS and DOJ transitional housing assistance programs for victims of domestic violence, respectively. The Keeping Children and Families Safe Act also extended to FY2008 authorization for the national domestic violence hotline and grants for battered women’s shelters programs.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (October 4, 2005) (+)

On September 28,2 005, the House approved H.R. 3402, the Department of Justice Appropriations Authorization Act, FY2006-2009, which contains provisions to reauthorize expiring Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) programs.
Both the House and Senate have passed H.R. 2862, an appropriations bill for the Department of Justice and related agencies, providing $386.04 million in FY2006 for Violence Against Women Act programs administered by the Department of Justice. The House passed H.R. 3010, providing a total of $129 million for VAWA programs administered by HHS. The Senate Appropriations Committee reported H.R. 3010 on July 14, 2005, recommending $129 million for VAWA programs administered by HHS.

[pdf] Violence Against women Act of 2000 (+)

HR 1248 would reauthorize and make key improvements in programs created by the Violence Against Women Act of 1994. Those programs include: law enforcement and prosecution grants to combat violence against women, national domestic violence hotline, battered women’s shelter and services, grants for community initiatives, education and training for judges and court personnel, grants to encourage arrest policies, rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement, national stalker and domestic violence reduction, federal victims’ counselors, education and prevention grants to reduce sexual abuse of runaway, homeless, and street youth, victims of child abuse, and rape prevention education. It would also create new programs, including civil legal assistance for victims, safe havens for children pilot program, protections against violence and abuse for women with disabilities, standards, practice and training for sexual assault examinations, and a requirement that a domestic violence task force report back to Congress on any overlapping or duplication of Federal agency efforts addressing domestic violence.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (June 9, 2005) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against women Act (VAWA) of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000. VAWA 2000 reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act through FY2005, set new funding levels, and added new programs.
For FY2006, President Bush requests $515 million for VAWA programs, of which $386 million is for programs administered by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and $129 million for programs administered by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
On December 8, 2004, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005, was enacted, which provided $387.28 milion in FY2005 funding for violence against women programs administered by DOJ and $129.9 million for those programs administered by HHS.
VAWA established within DOJ and HHS a number of discretionary grant programs for state, local, and Indian tribal governments. DOJ administers VAWA grants designed to aid law enforcement officers and prosecutors, encourage arrest policies, stem domestic violence and child abuse, establish and operate training programs for victim advocates and counselors, and train probation and parole officers who work with released sex offenders. Under HHS, grants include funds for battered women’s shelter, rape prevention and education, reduction of sexual abuse of runaway and homeless street youth, and community programs on domestic violence.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding (March 18, 2005) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against women Act (VAWA) of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000. VAWA 2000 reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act through FY2005, set new funding levels, and added new programs.
For FY2006, President Bush requests $515 million for VAWA programs, of which $386 million is for programs administered by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and $129 million for programs administered by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
On December 8, 2004, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005, was enacted, which provided $387.28 milion in FY2005 funding for violence against women programs administered by DOJ and $129.9 million for those programs administered by HHS.
VAWA established within DOJ and HHS a number of discretionary grant programs for state, local, and Indian tribal governments. DOJ administers VAWA grants designed to aid law enforcement officers and prosecutors, encourage arrest policies, stem domestic violence and child abuse, establish and operate training programs for victim advocates and counselors, and train probation and parole officers who work with released sex offenders. Under HHS, grants include funds for battered women’s shelter, rape prevention and education, reduction of sexual abuse of runaway and homeless street youth, and community programs on domestic violence.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (January 31, 2005) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against women Act (VAWA) of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000. VAWA 2000 reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act through FY2005, set new funding levels, and added new programs.
For FY2006, President Bush requests $515 million for VAWA programs, of which $386 million is for programs administered by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and $129 million for programs administered by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
On December 8, 2004, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005, was enacted, which provided $387.28 milion in FY2005 funding for violence against women programs administered by DOJ and $129.9 million for those programs administered by HHS.
VAWA established within DOJ and HHS a number of discretionary grant programs for state, local, and Indian tribal governments. DOJ administers VAWA grants designed to aid law enforcement officers and prosecutors, encourage arrest policies, stem domestic violence and child abuse, establish and operate training programs for victim advocates and counselors, and train probation and parole officers who work with released sex offenders. Under HHS, grants include funds for battered women’s shelter, rape prevention and education, reduction of sexual abuse of runaway and homeless street youth, and community programs on domestic violence.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (January 11, 2005) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against women Act (VAWA) of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000. VAWA 2000 reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act through FY2005, set new funding levels, and added new programs.
For FY2006, President Bush requests $515 million for VAWA programs, of which $386 million is for programs administered by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and $129 million for programs administered by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
On December 8, 2004, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005, was enacted, which provided $387.28 milion in FY2005 funding for violence against women programs administered by DOJ and $129.9 million for those programs administered by HHS.
VAWA established within DOJ and HHS a number of discretionary grant programs for state, local, and Indian tribal governments. DOJ administers VAWA grants designed to aid law enforcement officers and prosecutors, encourage arrest policies, stem domestic violence and child abuse, establish and operate training programs for victim advocates and counselors, and train probation and parole officers who work with released sex offenders. Under HHS, grants include funds for battered women’s shelter, rape prevention and education, reduction of sexual abuse of runaway and homeless street youth, and community programs on domestic violence.

[pdf] Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1996 (+)

Witness hearings on the fiscal year 1996 budget request. A series of hearings on the fiscal year 1996 budget request with representatives of the Administration coming before the Subcommittee to defend their budgets has already occurred. Now, it is interest groups and individuals’ opportunity.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (December 20, 2004) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386). The original Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), enacted Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (P.L. 103-322), became law in 1994. VAWA 2000 reauthorizes VAWA though FY2005, sets new funding levels, and adds new programs.
VAWA 2000 reauthorizes most of the original ac’s programs and creates new grant programs to prevent sexual assaults on campuses, assist victims of violence with civil legal concerns, create transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse, and enhance protections for elderly and disabled victims of domestic violence. VAWA 2000, also, creates a pilot program for safe custody exchange for families of domestic violence. Additionally, VAWA 2000 authorizes a number of studies on the effects of violence against women, creates a domestic violence task force, and includes changes in the federal criminal law relating to interstate stalking and immigration.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (July 15, 2004) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386). The original Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), enacted Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (P.L. 103-322), became law in 1994. VAWA 2000 reauthorizes VAWA though FY2005, sets new funding levels, and adds new programs.
VAWA 2000 reauthorizes most of the original ac’s programs and creates new grant programs to prevent sexual assaults on campuses, assist victims of violence with civil legal concerns, create transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse, and enhance protections for elderly and disabled victims of domestic violence. VAWA 2000, also, creates a pilot program for safe custody exchange for families of domestic violence. Additionally, VAWA 2000 authorizes a number of studies on the effects of violence against women, creates a domestic violence task force, and includes changes in the federal criminal law relating to interstate stalking and immigration.

[pdf] Sexual Harassment and Violence Against Women: Developments in Federal Law (+)

Gender-based discrimination, harassment, and violence against women in the workplace and society generally have assumed new legal and political significance as a consequence of recent high profile proceedings involving alleged misdeeds by elected government officials, members of the military, public school teachers and students, and the private corporate sectors. This report reviews the judicial evolution of sexual harassment law, including a discussion of four recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings that dealt with the issue of same-sex harassment and determined the liability of employers and school districts for harassment by supervisory employees and acts directed against public school students.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (March 25, 2004) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386). The original Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), enacted Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (P.L. 103-322), became law in 1994. VAWA 2000 reauthorizes VAWA though FY2005, sets new funding levels, and adds new programs.
VAWA 2000 reauthorizes most of the original ac’s programs and creates new grant programs to prevent sexual assaults on campuses, assist victims of violence with civil legal concerns, create transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse, and enhance protections for elderly and disabled victims of domestic violence. VAWA 2000, also, creates a pilot program for safe custody exchange for families of domestic violence. Additionally, VAWA 2000 authorizes a number of studies on the effects of violence against women, creates a domestic violence task force, and includes changes in the federal criminal law relating to interstate stalking and immigration.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (February 27, 2004) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386). The original Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), enacted Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (P.L. 103-322), became law in 1994. VAWA 2000 reauthorizes VAWA though FY2005, sets new funding levels, and adds new programs.
VAWA 2000 reauthorizes most of the original ac’s programs and creates new grant programs to prevent sexual assaults on campuses, assist victims of violence with civil legal concerns, create transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse, and enhance protections for elderly and disabled victims of domestic violence. VAWA 2000, also, creates a pilot program for safe custody exchange for families of domestic violence. Additionally, VAWA 2000 authorizes a number of studies on the effects of violence against women, creates a domestic violence task force, and includes changes in the federal criminal law relating to interstate stalking and immigration.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (March 19, 2003) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386). The original Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), enacted Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (P.L. 103-322), became law in 1994. VAWA 2000 reauthorizes VAWA though FY2005, sets new funding levels, and adds new programs.
VAWA 2000 reauthorizes most of the original ac’s programs and creates new grant programs to prevent sexual assaults on campuses, assist victims of violence with civil legal concerns, create transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse, and enhance protections for elderly and disabled victims of domestic violence. VAWA 2000, also, creates a pilot program for safe custody exchange for families of domestic violence. Additionally, VAWA 2000 authorizes a number of studies on the effects of violence against women, creates a domestic violence task force, and includes changes in the federal criminal law relating to interstate stalking and immigration.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (January 14, 2002) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386). The original Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), enacted Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (P.L. 103-322), became law in 1994. VAWA 2000 reauthorizes VAWA though FY2005, sets new funding levels, and adds new programs.
VAWA 2000 reauthorizes most of the original ac’s programs and creates new grant programs to prevent sexual assaults on campuses, assist victims of violence with civil legal concerns, create transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse, and enhance protections for elderly and disabled victims of domestic violence. VAWA 2000, also, creates a pilot program for safe custody exchange for families of domestic violence. Additionally, VAWA 2000 authorizes a number of studies on the effects of violence against women, creates a domestic violence task force, and includes changes in the federal criminal law relating to interstate stalking and immigration.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: History, Federal Funding, and Reauthorizing Legislation (October 12, 2001) (+)

On October 28, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act of 2000 as Division B of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386). The original Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), enacted Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (P.L. 103-322), became law in 1994. VAWA 2000 reauthorizes VAWA though FY2005, sets new funding levels, and adds new programs.
VAWA 2000 reauthorizes most of the original ac’s programs and creates new grant programs to prevent sexual assaults on campuses, assist victims of violence with civil legal concerns, create transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse, and enhance protections for elderly and disabled victims of domestic violence. VAWA 2000, also, creates a pilot program for safe custody exchange for families of domestic violence. Additionally, VAWA 2000 authorizes a number of studies on the effects of violence against women, creates a domestic violence task force, and includes changes in the federal criminal law relating to interstate stalking and immigration.

[pdf] CRS: Immigration: Noncitizen Victims of Family Violence (May 3, 2001) (+)

During the last decade, Congress has enacted special immigration provisions to assist the battered alien spouses (most of whom are women) and children of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents. To deter immigration-related marriage fraud, Congress, in 1986 had established a two-year conditional status for alien spouses and children who obtained permanent residence based on a recent marriage. In most cases, the alien and his or her spouse had to submit a joint petition at the end of the two-year period to have the condition removed. This requirement posed problems for battered aliens, who spouses often refused to cooperate in the filing of joint petitions. The 1990 Immigration Act created a special waiver of the joint petition requirement for battered spouses and children.
The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) of 1994 provided additional relief to noncitizen victims of family violence. It allowed them to file self-petitions for immigration preference status, rather than having to rely on their batterers to file initial petitions on their behalf. VAWA also established special requirements for battered alien spouses and children seeking relief from deportation.
In 1996, Congress enacted the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility ACT (IIRIRA), which contained strong measures to deter illegal immigration. Under IIRIRA, battered aliens were eligible for various exemptions. IIRIRA also amended the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), which had placed restrictions on alien eligibility for federal benefits.
The 106th Congress enacted the Battered Immigrant Protection Act (BIWPA) as part of the VAWA reauthorization bill. The Act provides relief in various areas, including cancellation of removal, adjustment of status, and self-petitioning. BIWPA included language from several similar bills that proposed to expand existing protections for noncitizen victims of family violence. They include measures to prevent violence against women, as well as bills to provide economic security and safety for battered women and to provide protection for battered alien women.

[pdf] CRS: Violence Against Women Act: Reauthorization, Federal Funding, and Recent Developments (January 25, 2001) (+)

On October 26, 2000, the President signed a five-year reauthorization of appropriations for the Violence Against Women Act, expired at the end of FY2000, together with an expansion of its programs (VAWA, Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, P.L. 103-322). On October 11, 2000, the Senate approved the conference report, H Rept 106-939, for the Sexual Trafficking Victims Protection Act (H.R. 3244/Smith, Christopher). Approved by the House on October 6, 2000, the measure contains language to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), as amended. The conference report notes that the bill reauthorizes through FY2005 the leading VAWA programs, and makes “targeted improvements,” such as authorizing grants for legal assistance for victims of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault, providing funding for transitional housing assistance, improving full faith and credit enforcement and computerized tracking of protection orders, strengthening and redefining the protections for battered immigrant women, and expanding existing grant programs to cover violence that arises in dating relationships.

[pdf] CRS: Sexual Harassment and Violence Against Women: Developments in Federal Law (May 25, 2000) (+)

Gender-based discrimination, harassment, and violence against women in the workplace and society generally have assumed new legal and political significance as a consequence of recent high profile proceedings involving alleged misdeeds by elected government officials, members of the military, public school teachers and students, and the private corporate sectors. This report reviews the judicial evolution of sexual harassment law, including a discussion of four recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings that dealt with the issue of same-sex harassment and determined the liability of employers and school districts for harassment by supervisory employees and acts directed against public school students.

[pdf] Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 Part II (+)

Report, with Minority Views, to accompany H.R. 3244. The Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 3244) to combat trafficking of persons, especially into the sex trade, slavery, and slavery-like conditions, in the United States and countries around the world through prevention, through prosecution and enforcement against traffickers, and through protection and assistance to victims of trafficking, having considered the same, reports favorably thereon with an amendment and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.

[pdf] The Violence Against Women Act of 1994: Evaluation of the STOP Block Grants to Combat Violence Against Women (+)

This report documents the federal and state activities and accomplishments in the initial year of implementing the resulting “STOP Violence Against Women” grants program. It was developed under a competitively awarded grant from the National Institute of Justice to provide a basis for reporting on the progress and impact of the program.

[pdf] Turning the Act Into Action: The Violence Against Women Law (+)

In the making for over four years, The Violence Against Women Act is finally law. Now it is time to turn the Act into action. Beginning in 1990, through a series of hearings and reports, the Senate Judiciary Committee studied the kinds of crimes- namely rape and family violence- that disproportionately burden women. What we learned is that our society and our criminal justice system routinely ignore and dismiss this violence, with tragic consequences for women, for their children, and ultimately for all of us.

[pdf] Domestic Violence: Not Just a Family Matter (+)

This hearing is about 4 million women a year whose names and faces are not gracing magazine covers and are not on the evening news. This hearing has three purposes: let you know that this could happen to someone you know, learn about mandatory arrest, and we are dedicated towards stopping domestic violence.