[pdf] Department of Homeland Security: U Visa Immigration Relief for Victims of Certain Crimes: An Overview for Law Enforcement (February 2017) (+)

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security published a tool that provides an overview for law enforcement and other government agencies (including judges) authorized by the U Visa statutes, regulations and policies to sign U visa certifications. The overview describes the role of a certifier, what constitutes U Visa criminal activity, which government agencies are eligible to certify, who can sign a certification, when a certification may be signed, tips for completing the certification, and includes phone numbers, websites and resources available to assist certifiers from DHS and United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.

[pdf] DHS Proteccions Para Las Víctimas Inmigrantes (Protections for Immigrant Victims) (+)

El Departamento de Seguridad Nacional ha producido una infografía que provee un resumen de protecciones legales para víctimas de crimen quien son adultos y niños. Esta infografía provee protección sobre inmigración para víctimas que sufren abuso en los estados unidos y/o en el extranjero. Las formas de alivio son: VAWA auto petición, Visa U, Visa T, Presencia Continua, Estado Especial de Inmigrante Juvenil (SIJS) y Asilo. Esta infografía tiene enlaces al sitio de web de DHS con materiales de entrenamiento e información sobre estos programas, formas de aplicaciones e instrucciones producido por el gobierno.

[pdf] DHS U and T Visa Law Enforcement Resource Guide Updated 11.30.15 (+)

Updated November 30, 2015, the Department of Homeland Security published an updated resource guide to clarify and further explain the role of certifying agencies in the U and T visa application process. This guide addresses concerns, answers common questions, and provides accurate information on signing I-918B and I-914B forms for federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial law enforcement, prosecutors, judges, and other government agencies qualified to sign U visa certifications such as the EEOC, federal and state labor departments, adult and child protective services, and any other eligible agencies that have criminal, civil, or administrative investigative or prosecutorial authority. The guide provides information on what U and T visas are, discusses U visa qualifying criminal activities and severe forms of trafficking in persons, explains the standard for “helpfulness” and “reasonable request for assistance”, and has many more important tips and information about the U and T visa.

[pdf] Immigrant Crime Victims and U Visa Certification – What is it and Why Should Judges Care? (National) (+)

This judicial training update published by Judge Alan F. Pendleton, Anoka County District Court, provides guidance on U visa certification by state court judges based on the ABA rules of judicial ethics and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) policies, regulations, training materials and statutes and consultation with DHS U visa experts. This training update for judges discusses the U visa program, dispels common myths about U visa certification by judges, answers questions judges and court staff have about U visa certification, and discusses judicial ethics ABA rules and a 2015 Minnesota Advisory Opinion discussing how, when and why judges can sign U visa certifications consistent with judicial ethics rules and canons.

[pdf] Immigrant Crime Victims and U Visa Certification – What is it and Why Should Judges Care? (Minnesota) (+)

This judicial training update published by Judge Alan F. Pendleton, Anoka County District Court, provides guidance on U visa certification by state court judges based on the ABA rules of judicial ethics and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) policies, regulations, training materials and statutes and consultation with DHS U visa experts. This training update for judges discusses the U visa program, dispels common myths about U visa certification by judges, answers questions judges and court staff have about U visa certification, and discusses how, when and why the Minnesota Code of Judicial Conduct permits signing of U visa certifications and the June 26, 2015 Minnesota Board of Judicial Standards Advisory Opinion 2015-2 on this issue.

[pdf] U-Visa “Helpfulness” Checklist (+)

This checklist has been developed to assist police, prosecutors, judges, commissioners, magistrates and other U visa certifying officials in identifying the wide range of ways an immigrant crime victim can provide helpfulness to justice system officials and government agencies in detection, investigation, prosecution, conviction or sentencing of U visa listed criminal activity. The document includes citations to U.S. Department of Homeland Security policies, regulations, guidance and training materials on U visa certification and helpfulness. A national team of law enforcement, prosecutors and judicial trainers with expertise and experience on the U visa contributed to the development of the list of examples of helpfulness included in this document based on their experience and expertise.

[pdf] American Online Dating Association v. Gonzales (+)

Plaintiff challenging the IMBRA and requesting a temporary restraining order prohibiting enforcement of IMBRA sections, which require international marriage brokers to search national and state sex offender registries and collect domestic client information regarding arrests and convictions, restraining orders, marital history, and ages of minor children and requires the disclosure of this information to potential foreign spouses. Court denied Plaintiff’s Motion for a Temporary Restraining Order.

[pdf] Federal Register: Adjustment of Status to Lawful Permanent Resident for Aliens in T or U Nonimmigrant Status (+)

The Department of Homeland Security is amending its regulations to permit aliens in lawful T or U nonimmigrant status to apply for adjustment of status to lawful permanent resident. This rule provides that family members of a principal T or U nonimmigrant granted or seeking adjustment of status may also apply for adjustment of status to lawful permanent resident. This rule also
provides for adjustment of status or approval of an immigrant petition for certain family members of U applicants who were never admitted to the United States in U nonimmigrant status.

[pdf] Executive Summary: Blue Campaign Stakeholder Meeting with Senior Counselor Alice Hill (+)

On December 10, 2010, Alice Hill, Senior Counselor to the Secretary of Homeland Security, hosted a meeting with stakeholders in the fight against human trafficking. The meeting was the second stakeholder meeting of the DHS Blue Campaign to combat human trafficking, launched in July of 2010. The Blue Campaign’s mission is “To harness the authorities and resources of the Department of Homeland Security to deter human trafficking by increasing awareness, protecting victims, and contributing to a robust criminal justice response.” The meeting focused on current projects of the Blue Campaign as well as future deliverables. Invitees included representatives from throughout the federal government, state and local law enforcement, non-governmental organizations, foreign governments, the United States Congress, the private sector, and the general public.

[pdf] Current State of VAWA and Trafficking Victim Protection Act Implementing Regulations and Policies (+)

The following article provides an up-to-date list of VAWA statutory provisions for which no implementing regulations or policies have been issued. This list is followed by a consequent list of VAWA and Trafficking Victim
Protection Act (TVPA) regulations that were overruled by statute. This report ends with a list of
current regulations that do not reflect expansions of VAWA or TVPA protections that became
law subsequent to the issuance of the regulations.

[pdf] Immigration Relief for Victims of Human Trafficking and Other Crimes (Continued Presence, T and U Visas) (+)

Information for law enforcement officials on immigration relief for victims of human trafficking and other crimes. This document contains information about the forms of immigration relief and the distinct roles that HSI, USCIS, and law enforcement officials play in assisting victims.

[pdf] Chapter 03: VAWA Confidentiality: History, Purpose, DHS Implementation, and Violations of VAWA Confidentiality Protections (+)

Chapter in Empowering Survivors: Legal Rights of Immigrant Victims of Sexual Assault. This chapter contains detailed legislative history on the development and evolution of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) confidentiality protections under U.S. immigration laws. VAWA’s immigration confidentiality protections accomplish three objectives: 1) preventing DHS, DOJ and the U.S. State Department from relying on information provided by a perpetrator or the perpetrator’s family member to harm victims; 2) barring the release by government officials of information about the existence of, actions taken in, or materials contained in a VAWA confidentiality protected case file; and 3) establishing a list of protected locations at which immigration enforcement actions in cases involving immigrant crime victims are not to take place. This chapter discusses each of these protections in detail and includes statutory and legislative history, regulations and government policies implementing VAWA confidentiality protections. This chapter also contains a discussion of sanctions applicable to DHS, DOJ, and State Department officials when VAWA confidentiality violations occur.

September 26, 2013: Roll Call Videos for Law Enforcement on U Visa Certification and T Visa Endorsement

These roll call videos for law enforcement were developed under a collaboration between the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, and the National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project, American University, Washington College of Law.

The videos describe local law enforcement’s role in collaborating with DHS in identification of immigrant victims of human trafficking, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and other crimes and the importance of signing U visa certifications and T visa endorsements in for immigrant crime victims.

[pdf] Department of Homeland Security Policy Answers to Law Enforcement Reasons for Not Certifying (+)

This document presents a list of many questions frequently asked by government agencies considering U visa certification. For each of the often reported reasons that agencies provide for not certifying the documents lists provides correct information in response to that question based on citations to information from published DHS policies, publications, regulations, regulatory history, statutes, roll call videos and training materials.

[pdf] U Visa Law Enforcement Certification Resource Guide (+)

Department of Homeland Security resource guide clarifies and explains the role of certifying agencies in the U visa application process. This guide was published by DHS to provide accurate information on signing I-918B forms for federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial law enforcement, prosecutors, judges, and other government agencies qualified to sign U visa certifications such as the EEOC, federal and state labor departments, adult and child protective services, and any other eligible agencies that have criminal, civil, or administrative investigative or proprietorial authority. The guide provides information about what a U visa is, how law enforcement and government agencies have a special role in certification, tips on filling out the form, and contains answers to frequently asked questions.

[pdf] Prosecutorial Discretion: Certain Victims, Witnesses, and Plaintiffs (+)

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 2011 Memorandum setting forth the policies that direct the use of prosecutorial discretion in cases involving victims of and witnesses to crimes, including crimes of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, and other crimes. It includes protections from removal for individuals involved in efforts related to the protection of their civil rights. This document establishes DHS priorities for victim protection and summarizes and contains links to Immigration and Customs Enforcement policies of importance to immigrant crime victim cases.

[pdf] DHS Broadcast Message on New 384 Class of Admission Code (+)

Broadcast from the Department of Homeland Security to DHS personnel on the creation of the Class of Admission “384” code in the Central Index System, that alerts personnel of an immigrant victim who is protected by VAWA confidentiality protections.

[pdf] T and U-visa Holders Need Legal Permanent Residency: Real Life Stories (+)

A collection of real life stories that illustrate the hardships U visa and T visa holders face without access to lawful permanent residency included in the U visa and T visa statues. This collection was submitted to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Office of Budget and Management as part of advocacy to secure issuance and influence the protections that would be included in the T and U visa lawful permanent residency (adjustment of status) regulations.

[pdf] Memorandum: Interim Guidance Relating to Officer Procedure Following Enactment of VAWA 2005 (+)

Memorandum from John Torres to Field Office Directors and Special Agents in Charge providing guidance to operational units of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement on the new confidentiality procedures created by VAWA 2005 in cases involving individuals who may be eligible to apply for VAWA benefits or T or U visas.