Evidence Checklists For Work With Immigrant Survivors (February 11, 2017)

NIWAP has developed a number of checklists that assist attorneys and advocates working with immigrant survivors to prepare for a variety of legal cases on behalf of immigrant survivors.  Some of the following checklists are geared toward preparing to accompany a victim who will be applying for state or federal public benefits that the victim […]

[pdf] Comparison Chart of U visa, T Visa, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Self-Petition, Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS), and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) (+)

A chart comparing the eligibility, process, and benefits of U Visas, T Visas, VAWA Self-Petition, Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SJIS), and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Written by Krisztina Szabo, Spencer Cantrell, and Leslye Orloff.

[pdf] Comparing Forms of Immigration Relief for Immigrant Victims of Crime (+)

This chart has been developed as a tool to help advocates, attorneys, judges, law enforcement and other professionals to promote a basic understanding of how various forms of immigration relief available to help immigrant crime victims and children differ. The chart compares eligibility requirements, access to employment authorization and lawful permanent residency, and the application process.

[pdf] Defensa Para Mejorar Servicios Para Mujeres Emigrantes E Inmigrantes Maltratadas Que Viven En Comunidades Rurales (+)

Evidence Lists for VAWA self-petitioners in Spanish. Lista en español de documentos necesarios o útiles para un caso de inmigración para una auto-petición de víctima de violencia doméstica o maltrato cruel.

[pdf] Chapter 08: Immigration Relief for Child Sexual Assault Survivors (+)

Chapter in Empowering Survivors: Legal Rights of Immigrant Victims of Sexual Assault. This chapter provides basic information on various immigration remedies available to child survivors of sexual abuse and/or assault. This chapter will cover: (1) VAWA (“Violence Against Women Act”) self-petitioning; (2) VAWA cancellation of removal and suspension of deportation; (3) Special Immigrant Juvenile status (“SIJ”); (4) U-visas/interim relief; (5) T-visas; and (6) asylum.

[pdf] “Extreme Hardship” and Documentary Requirements Involving Battered Spouses and Children (+)

This USCIS memorandum discusses the unique factors that will be considered when determining “extreme hardship” and “extreme cruelty”. The memo also discusses the documentary requirements involving battered spouses and children.

[pdf] DOJ Memorandum on the Implementation of Crime Bill Self-Petitioning for Abused or Battered Spouses or Children of U.S. Citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents (April 16, 1996) (+)

DOJ Memorandum on the Implementation of Crime Bill Self-Petitioning for Abused or Battered Spouses or Children of U.S. Citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents (April 16, 1996). This memo details the basic eligibility requirements for VAWA self-petitioning, adjustment of status, employment authorization, evidence in general, extreme hardship and battery and extreme cruelty. HQ 204-P

[pdf] Current State of VAWA and Trafficking Victim Protection Act Implementing Regulations and Policies (+)

The following article provides an up-to-date list of VAWA statutory provisions for which no implementing regulations or policies have been issued. This list is followed by a consequent list of VAWA and Trafficking Victim
Protection Act (TVPA) regulations that were overruled by statute. This report ends with a list of
current regulations that do not reflect expansions of VAWA or TVPA protections that became
law subsequent to the issuance of the regulations.

[pdf] Chapter 07: Preparing the VAWA Self-Petition and Applying for Lawful Residence (+)

Chapter 7 in Empowering Survivors: Legal Rights of Immigrant Victims of Sexual Assault. This chapter provides practical tips for filing a self-petition and apply for lawful permanent residency under the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (VAWA) as revised in 2005.

[pdf] Battering or Extreme Cruelty: Drawing Examples from Civil Protection Order and Family Law Cases (+)

This document details the range of behaviors that would constitute “battery or extreme cruelty” used by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and draws examples from decisions state court judges deemed abusive/domestic violence in granting civil protection orders and determining of family violence in family law cases.

[pdf] Somewhere to Turn (+)

A comprehensive manual covering topics such as: domestic violence and battered immigrant issues, cultural competency training, cross-cultural interviewing, recruiting and hiring multilingual and multicultural staff, shelter protocols, outreach and community collaboration, shelter access for battered immigrant women, VAWA immigration cases and victim advocacy confidentiality, creative use of protection orders, protections orders enforcement and criminal prosecution, access to public benefits, verification and reporting requirements under the U.S. Attorney General’s guidance and order, and model programs.

[pdf] Offering a Helping Hand: Legal Protections for Battered Immigrant Women: A History of Legislative Responses (+)

This article chronicles the legislative history of immigration protections afforded immigrant crime victims in the Violence Against Women Acts (VAWA) of 1994 and 2000, through the Battered Spouse Waiver, and through VAWA Confidentiality, the history and development of the VAWA self-petition, VAWA cancellation of removal, the battered spouse waiver, any credible evidence standard, VAWA confidentiality, benefits access for battered immigrant VAWA self-petitioners and cancellation/suspension applicants, the U-Visa, victim’s ability to obtain lawful permanent residency in the U.S. and Legal Services Corporation funded legal assistance are discussed in detail. This article collects and publishes information contained in documents developed during advocacy that led to the passage of federal immigration law legislation creating each of these protections.

[pdf] Mandatory U-visa Certification Unnecessarily Undermines the Purpose of the Violence Against Women Act’s Immigration Protections and Its “Any Credible Evidence” Rules – A Call for Consistency (+)

This article discusses the development of immigration law’s “any credible evidence” standard of proof and its application in VAWA and TVPA related immigration cases. This article urges reforms in immigration law to remove U-visa certification as a mandatory prerequisite that bars many otherwise eligible immigrant crime victims from being able to access U-visa protections.