[pdf] Hawaii Materials Benefits-Confidentiality Training (March 15, 2017) (+)

Materials list covering the following topics: Legal Rights Overview and Brochures; Access to Public Benefits and Services for Immigrant Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victims; Child Care; Drivers’ Licenses; Education; Health Care; Shelter and Transitional Housing; Public and Assisted Housing; LIHEAP; Non-Work Social Security Numbers; Public Charge and Immigrant Victims; TANF; VAWA Confidentiality; Legal Services Representation of Immigrant Victims; and Immigrant Victim’s Immigration Options

[pdf] AND LEGAL SERVICES FOR ALL: NEW 2014 LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING VAWA 2005’S IMMIGRANT CRIME SURVIVORS’ ACCESS TO LEGAL SERVICES (October 30, 2014) (+)

This is a recording of the webinar broadcast November 3, 2014. “And Legal Services for All: New 2014 Legal Services Corporation Regulations Implementing VAWA 2005’s Immigrant Crime Survivors’ Access to Legal Services.” Closed captions will be available for this webinar soon. The recording runs for 1 hour 32 minutes.

Permissibility of Providing Legal Services to Noncitizen Parents and Noncitizen Guardians of Children Seeking Special Immigrant Juvenile Status

August 26, 2016 The Legal Services Corporation’s (LSC) General Counsel issued an Advisory Opinion confirming that legal services agencies receiving funding from LSC may represent noncitizen parents/guardians of noncitizen children who have suffered battering, extreme cruelty, sexual assault, human trafficking or other U visa-listed criminal activities. The legal assistance provided must be directly related to […]

[pdf] Legal Services Access for All: Implementing the Violence Against Women Act of 2005 (+)

Provides information about the improved accessibility to representation for immigrant crime victims by Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) funded programs that was created by the Anti-Abuse LSC regulations and policies issued in 2014. The article is published in National Legal Aid & Defender Association’s Cornerstone Magazine (January-April 2015). The pdf includes a second article on the need for pro bono representation of immigrant children.

[pdf] LSC Cover Letter AO 2016-002 (Revised) (+)

Cover letter from Legal Services Corporation General Counsel updating Advisory Opinion 2016-002’s revision. This cover letter informs LSC programs about this advisory opinion allowing LSC funded agencies to represent non-citizen parents and guardians of abused noncitizen children in cases that benefit the noncitizen abused child. The principal revision is to clarify that LSC is using the term “guardian” to refer to individuals who have custody of and responsibility for the child in question, regardless of whether that individual is the child’s court-appointed guardian or custodian.

[pdf] Abused Abandoned or Neglected- Legal Options for Recent Immigrant Women and Girls (August 2016) (+)

This article discusses legal options for immigrant girls and immigrant women who are recent immigrants to the United States. It provides an overview of legal immigration relief options including the VAWA self-petition, U Visa, T Visa, Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. The article provides a detailed legislative history of SIJS, discusses the importance of trauma informed screening of immigrant children for immigration relief eligibility, and provides an overview of help that Legal Services Corporation funded programs can provide to immigrant children who have suffered battering, extreme cruelty, sexual assault or human trafficking. Importantly the article provides a detailed discussion of the special role state family and juvenile courts play and legal issues that arise in state court proceedings that are a prerequisite to a child’s ability to file a case seeking SIJS immigration relief.

[pdf] HUD Cover to HUD, HHS, and DOJ Joint Letter Regarding Immigrant Access to Housing and Ser (+)

This letter reiterates long standing federal policies that immigrants cannot be denied access to certain services necessary to protect life and safety based on their immigration status.

This letter reiterates that immigrants experiencing homelessness, victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, stalking or human trafficking may not be turned away on the basis of immigration status from life and safety services including but not limited to emergency shelters, and short-term housing assistance (including transitional housing and rapid re-housing), crisis counseling and intervention, soup kitchens, community food banks, and medical and public health services.

Importantly, this Tri-Agency letter describes the non-discrimination requirements that apply to all federal grantees and the application of these protections to cases involving immigrants.

[pdf] And Legal Services for All: Implementing the Violence Against Women Act of 2005’s New Path to Legal Services Corporation Funded Representation for Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Human Trafficking, and Other Crimes (+)

This article contains a detailed description of the history and purpose of access to legal services funded by the Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) for immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and other U visa listed criminal activities. It provides a detailed analysis of the 2014 LSC regulations, policies and the services they provide to immigrant victims, and highlights the very real implications that a lack of legal services can have for individuals who need them most.

[pdf] Guide: Access to Publicly Funded Legal Services for Immigrant Survivors (+)

In 2014, the Legal Service Corporation (LSC) issued regulations confirming that all immigrant crime victims are legally eligible for LSC funded legal services under anti-abuse regulations. This brochure discusses immigration status based eligibility as well as eligibility under anti-abuse laws. It provides advocates with a guide to immigrant crime victim access to LSC funded legal services, including an illustration on how VAWA, U-visa, and trafficking victims become eligible for LSC representation.

[pdf] Access to Legal Services for Immigrant Victims of Domestic Violence Sexual Assault and Trafficking (+)

Collection of stories illustrating immigrant victims need for access to legal services from LSC funded legal services agencies. These stories illustrate the dangers that will be prevented and the victims that will be helped by the VAWA 2005 amendments that guarantee that LSC-funded legal services programs can offer a range of life-saving legal assistance to immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and trafficking. This story collection was developed to encourage LSC funded agencies to implement the VAWA 2005 changes and open their doors to immigrant victims and to assist LSC in writing policies and regulations that result in improved immigrant victim access to legal services.

[pdf] Services and Assistance Legally Available to Help Immigrant Victims of Violence Against Women (+)

Training powerpoint on public benefits from the December 1, 2010 Sioux Falls, South Dakata

[pdf] The Violence Against Women Act Now Ensures Legal Services for Immigrant Victims (+)

Article discussing the need for the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”) 2005’s expansions of access to legal services for immigrant victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking. An overview of the VAWA 2005 Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) amendments is provided including who is newly eligible, the scope of allowable representation, and best practices for implementation of the new law.

[pdf] Offering a Helping Hand: Legal Protections for Battered Immigrant Women: A History of Legislative Responses (+)

This article chronicles the legislative history of immigration protections afforded immigrant crime victims in the Violence Against Women Acts (VAWA) of 1994 and 2000, through the Battered Spouse Waiver, and through VAWA Confidentiality, the history and development of the VAWA self-petition, VAWA cancellation of removal, the battered spouse waiver, any credible evidence standard, VAWA confidentiality, benefits access for battered immigrant VAWA self-petitioners and cancellation/suspension applicants, the U-Visa, victim’s ability to obtain lawful permanent residency in the U.S. and Legal Services Corporation funded legal assistance are discussed in detail. This article collects and publishes information contained in documents developed during advocacy that led to the passage of federal immigration law legislation creating each of these protections.

[pdf] St. Petersburg Times Article: For Lack of Legal Services (+)

An article on a the death of Mariella Batista, a battered immigrant who was turned away from legal services under new Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) restrictions on representing immigrants, and was subsequently killed by her batterer on the courthouse steps in California. This story was the catalyst that led to the passage of the Kennedy Amendment to the LSC Appropriations Act in 1996 authorizing the use of non-LSC funds to represent some battered immigrants.

[pdf] New York Times Article: A Test of Congressional Conscience (+)

An article on a the death of Mariella Batista a battered immigrant who was turned away from legal services under new Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) restrictions on representing immigrants, and was subsequently killed by her batterer on the courthouse steps in California. This story was the catalyst that led to the passage of the Kennedy Amendment to the LSC Appropriations Act in 1996 authorizing the use of non-LSC funds to represent some battered immigrants.

[pdf] Washington Post Article: Abused Immigrant Slain After Plea for Legal Services Help Is Denied (+)

An article on the death of Mariella Batista, a battered immigrant who was turned away from legal services under new Legal Services Corporation (“LSC”) restrictions on representing immigrants, and was subsequently killed by her batterer on the courthouse steps in California. This story was the catalyst that led to the passage of the Kennedy Amendment to the LSC Appropriations Act in 1996 authorizing the use of non-LSC funds to represent some battered immigrants.